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Art & Culture of Japan

Artist Jimmy Mirikitani

Artist Jimmy Mirikitani

Exhibition: May 3-28
Opening Reception: May 5, 6-8pm

 

Part of the CCA 2017 Cultural Art Series, Columbia Arts celebrates the Arts & Culture of Japan throughout the Center–in the Gallery, the Theatre, and the Classroom. The main Gallery will feature a Bonseki display by artist Herb Bastuscheck from Salem; an exhibition by the Oregon Pottery Association in collaboration with the Mashiko Ceramics & Arts Association from Japan; an exhibition of the work of the artist Jimmy Mirikitani from the Wing Luke Museum in Seattle; contemporary Japanese prints from the Davidson Gallery in Seattle (Lobby Gallery); and an exhibition on the life of Hood River resident Minoru Yasui (Citizen Min), a recent Congressional Medal of Honor winner (Nook Gallery).

  • The Art of Jimmy Mirikitani on loan from the Wing Luke Museum
    Originally born in Sacramento in 1920, Jimmy Mirikitani was raised in Hiroshima, where he quickly showed a talent for painting. He returned to the US in 1938 to pursue his art, but ended up in the Tule Lake internment camp during the war, where he lost his US citizenship. After moving to New York, he tried to revive his art career, and later trained as a cook. When his employer died in the late 1980s, Jimmy suddenly became homeless. He lived on the streets of New York for over ten years, selling his art to survive. Jimmy lived in Soho, very close to the World Trade Towers and was severely affected by 9/11. In 2001, he met film-maker Linda Hattendorf, who produced and directed the award winning documentary The Cats of Mirikitani. Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani passed away on Sunday October 21, 2012. He was 92 years old. True to his word, he continued making art until his final days.
  • Oregon Pottery Association & Mashiko Ceramics and Arts Association
    When that devastating earthquake happened in Japan in March, 2011, Oregon Pottery Association (OPA) found out that the pottery town of Mashiko had all the wood firing kilns destroyed or heavily damaged, as well as gas and electric kilns, studios, and homes. Because of destruction elsewhere, the media mostly ignored Mashiko’s damage. As word spread, many OPA members helped organize a 2011 Showcase fundraising booth. Jeanne Henry Michelle Gallagher, Steven Mickey, Motoko Hori, and Ruri Sato set up a donation booth, and many members donated bowls and other clay work to raise funds to send to the potters to rebuild kilns in Mashiko.
  • Bonseki by Herb Bastuscheck
    Bonseki is the art of creating a landscape on a black rectangular or oval lacquer tray using white sand, pebbles, and small rocks. Bon means “tray” and seki means “rock,” so bonseki translates as “tray with rocks.” It was developed at the Ryuanji Temple in Kyoto with the samurai Hosokawa family. Bonseki is similar to the tea ceremony, where meditation accompanies a learned pattern of actions. Finished bonseki trays were placed in the little alcoves below the hanging scrolls in family tea ceremony rooms. When the art form was developed 600 to 800 years ago, it was much more stylized than it is today. About 100 years ago, bonseki artists went to Europe to study art, and upon their return to Japan, they influenced the creation of photo-like pictures. Today colored rocks, fossils, and miniature structures such as bridgesand temples are sometimes added. Herb Bastuscheck creates these sand paintings using small tools such as swan feathers, small spoons, and sieves that are ceremonially placed about his workspace. The typical boneski landscape contains features such as Mt Fuji, rivers, lakes, mountains, or waterfalls. A scene may take two hours or more to create, while a quick demonstration takes as little as twenty minutes.
  • Contemporary Japanese Prints from the Davidson Galleries
    Davidson Galleries, located in Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square, maintains the largest inventory of fine, original prints in the Northwest.  In addition to their holding of nearly 20,000 prints and works on paper ranging from the 15th to the 21st century, new exhibitions are mounted every month for the First Thursday Gallery Walk. CCA’s Exhibition this month feature original prints from their Japanese collection.
  • Citizen Min: Minoru Yasui  Retrospective Exhibition
    This retrospective honors Minoru Yasui, posthumous recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor and Hood River Native, who purposely violated the military curfew imposed on Japanese citizens under the law EO9066 in order to test his constitutionality. Min was imprisoned for his trust and belief in the American constitution, and spent nine months in solitary confinement at the Multnomah County Jail as he appealed his case to the US Supreme Court. He was released from jail in 1943, only to be sent to the Minidoka American concentration internment camp in Idaho. After the war, Min moved to Denver where he continued to fight for the rights of all people.In 2015 he was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama, which was followed by a unanimous passing by the Oregon Senate and House to designate March 28 as Minoru Yasui Day.

Presented as part of The Art & Culture of Japan

This show is underwritten by Fred W. Fields Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation, The Oregon Cultural Trust,  The Templeton Foundation, Catherine Watters Sasanuma & Daisuke Sasanuma, James & Ella Hasegawa, Windermere Realty, Don & Bonnie Benton, Lillian Kurahara, Yuri Hasegawa, Ruth Akiyama, Tom T. Sumoge, Neil A. Watanabe DMD, Maija Yasui, the Cree Family given In Memoriam for the Endow Family, and Nancy Tamura.


This Gallery Exhibition is generously sponsored by

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